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Frisco Del Rosario writes about chess960, women's basketball, minor league baseball, unsupported collectible card games, lettering in comic books, and Golden Age movies

2003 Frisky Awards for Best Animated Feature Among Those Nominated by the MPAA 10/28/2017

The 2003 Friskies

The nominees are “Brother Bear” (Disney), “Finding Nemo” (Pixar), and “The Triplets of Belleville” (Les Armateurs).

Brother Bear

In today’s parlance, I could say about “Brother Bear”: “It’s so Disney. I can’t even.”, and you’d know what I meant.

It’s about a boy whose tribal customs deem him of age, but he doesn’t truly grow into it until he’s been magically transformed into a bear, and goes on a vision quest with a younger bear. While his human brother tracks him for the kill, in the mistaken identity trope that belongs in every body-switching movie.

Throw in some music that kinda reminds one of “The Lion King” — unintentionally, you bet — gorgeous ink-and-paint animation, and a rousing party where everyone’s a talking bear, and it’s so Disney.

It’s pretty good, just a distant third behind 2003’s other nominees.

Finding Nemo

Pixar had hit the jackpot by addressing childhood fears: monsters under the bed, and toys that come to terrifying life.

Then they said: OK, let’s scare the adults by making a movie about a lost child, but it has to be adorable. What, we can’t satisfactorily animate hair until next year’s “The Incredibles”? But we’ve got water down? All right, let’s make them adorable fish. The state-of-the-art underwater graphics, lay it on thick.

And let’s get Ellen DeGeneres to voice the partner in the dad’s rescue party, because she’s awesome.

Pixar used to make fantastically great caper movies. Woody had to rescue Buzz. Albert Brooks the fish has to avoid sharks, while his missing kid and his new friends concoct a scheme to escape an aquarium — a scheme that works with insanely great cartoon logic.

I’m glad I don’t have children. I’d be more overprotective than Albert Brooks.

The Triplets of Belleville

“The Triplets of Belleville” is everything last year’s MPAA award winner, “Spirited Away”, wanted to be: graphically bizarre and grotesquely drawn, but understandably stated.

“Spirited Away” expressed all that an animated film might desire, except for a thread of logic. “Triplets of Belleville” gave us a kindly gnome of an aunt who pursues an ocean liner across the Atlantic in a paddleboat, because the French mafia has kidnapped her bicyclist savant of a nephew for a gambling operation.

Penniless in North America, she finds allies in the Triplets of Belleville, music hall singers in the ’30s, turned improvisational jazz group, playing kitchen items for instruments. They’re so broke that their diet is only frogs that they’ve dynamited out of the lake.

With the aid of the triplets and the faithful family dog Bruno, Aunt Souza uncovers and breaks tne gambling ring. The chase scene at the end can only work if it gives the sense of making fun of every movie chase scene, ever.

With almost zero dialogue

It wouldn’t do the movie justice to say “the story is off-the-charts weird and the animation is outlandish, but I mean that in a good way”. I mean it in a *great* way.

I preferred “The Triplets of Belleville” to “Finding Nemo”, but it surely would not be everyone’s cup of tea. If I had to recommend either to a group — especially one including children — everyone will love “Finding Nemo”. It’s the only tiebreaker I can imagine.

The winner of the 2003 Frisky Award is “Finding Nemo”.

Frisky Awards for Best Animated Feature Among Those Nominated in That MPAA Category

2003 — Finding Nemo
2002 — Lilo and Stitch*
2001 — Shrek

*The Frisky doesn’t correspond with the Academy Award.

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