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Frisco Del Rosario writes about chess960, women's basketball, minor league baseball, unsupported collectible card games, lettering in comic books, and Golden Age movies

If a chess student must annotate his own game, start at the point where both kings are active 10/28/2017

If a chess student were tasked with publishing or sharing analysis of one of his games, and asked me which to choose, I’d say: “Find a game where both sides have active kings in a roughly equal position. Otherwise, forget it.”

Each of us — little kid students and creaky old teachers — should learn chess from the end of the game. If the idea of analyzing one’s own game is learning from the mistakes, then analyze the phase of the game where the mistakes actually matter. At the start of the game, one mistake won’t kill you. At the end, one mistake will turn a win into a draw, a draw into a loss.

Asking a kid to annotate a chess game from move one is nonsense, because no kid is capable of doing that. The opening is the *hard* part. If we teach them with the endings, let’s find out if they’ve learned anything.

Mistakes in the opening —unless they’re blundering pieces — are too subtle for kids to appreciate. In the endgames, the mistakes are easier to identify: A passed or potentially-passed pawn wasn’t pushed. A rook didn’t seek activity. These are mistakes that can be corrected.

Chess educators should agree on this much: Chess should be learned from the endgame. Middlegames should be approached with the notion of simplifying into won endings, or avoiding lost ones. The only real objective in the opening is to reach a playable middlegame.

The goal in the ending is succinct: Create a passed pawn, and promote it before the opponent does.

The goal in the middlegame has to be based on some feature in the position, of which there can be dozens.

The goal in the opening is to get to the middlegame alive.

It grows increasingly vague the earlier it is in the chess game. Why ask people to write about unclear topics?

The later it is in the game, the more specifically a writer can be about the prose, and the more likely a student can dissect his or his opponent’s thinking.

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