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Frisco Del Rosario writes about chess960, women's basketball, minor league baseball, unsupported collectible card games, lettering in comic books, and Golden Age movies

Maybe I saw luxury sports automaker Pagani’s most complicated car a month before its introduction at the Geneva Motor Show 02/22/2017

huayra-roadster-ginevra-2017-00000-300x212Years ago, I spotted a student’s father reading Hot Rod magazine during the kid’s chess game. Maybe I looked at the cover weirdly.

“You look confused,” he said.

“I… I’m not a car guy,” I said.

“What? Sure you are. Just not the cars in this magazine.”

He was right. My cars were ’60s Volkswagens with aircooled engines suitable for lawnmowers. I subscribed to VW Trends magazine, and attended Volkswagen conventions, in search of parts and girls.

I’ll always think the Volkswagen Karmann Ghia was the most beautiful car ever designed. It was essentially a Volkswagen Beetle “in a sporty, Italian-designed body,” the ad said.

The ad deserves its own story. The best print ad campaign of the 20th century, according to Ad Age magazine, was the “Think Small” campaign for Volkswagen by Doyle Dane Bernbach. “Think Small” described the Beetle’s economical ways in a charming and straightforward manner, with a clean and minimal page layout — even the advertising said “small and self-deprecating, but inexpensive and awesome”. My father always said that his dark blue ’69 Beetle was the best car he ever owned.

When I learned to drive, it was in a Beetle, with one of my chess club cronies, a Volkswagen restoration mechanic. He re-introduced me to the Karmann Ghia, and it was love at first sight, again. (In my first year of journalism classes, the school newspaper editor drove a Karmann Ghia and dated the prettiest girl on staff.) My first car, naturally, was a half-green-half-primer-gray Karmann Ghia with one orange door.

25 years later, the sight of a clean Karmann Ghia on the road can still make me gasp — the Germans sure knew how to engineer a car, and the Italians sure knew how to design them. They don’t make ’em like that anymore — whether by federal regulation or consumer fashion. For neat Italian automotive styling, the modern winner is the Fiat 500 Abarth.

Today’s Italian sports cars — the Ferrari and Lamborghini, for instance — are designed to shock and awe; I prefer the simple lines and curves of the Karmann Ghia. However, I’ve seen the most shocking and awe-inspiring, elite superpowered Italian sports car: the Pagani Huayra, a car with the aura of a magic carpet.

Pagani’s manufacture of the Huayra in 2012 was such an occasion in the sporting automotive world that the BBC series “Top Gear” devoted to the Huayra the first segment of its Season 19 premiere. “Top Gear” is car porn. If you’ve ever been fascinated by a fast, expensive car, “Top Gear” is the chewiest eye candy. And “Top Gear’s” verdict was to urge anyone in their audience with enough cash ($1.1 million — when you ask what could possibly bring the cost of an automobile up to $1.1 million, consider that Pagani carves its name badges and wheel rims from solid pieces of aluminum.) to do so — the Huayra broke “Top Gear’s” speed record, while its engineering touches blew the hosts away.

“Top Gear” was pleased to say Pagani fills the void that Lamborghini and Ferrari left behind when Lamborghini was sold to Volkswagen-Audi and when Ferrari became a label for lifestyle items — “Top Gear’s” host used the term “innocence” to describe Pagani’s brand name purity, and railed against Ferrari putting its logos on teddy bears while neglecting automotive engineering.

The “Top Gear” segment about the Huayra was made in 2012. Five years in the luxury automobile industry is probably like five years in the software industry — everything has changed, so what was the deal with the shiny new Huayra I saw two weeks ago? According to Wikipedia, Pagani plans to unveil the new Huayra Roadster at the Geneva Motor Show in March. The Huayra Roadster is the “most complicated project we have ever undertaken,” said automaker Horacio Pagani.

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